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Digital Natives: voices that demand to be heard

Digital Natives: voices that demand to be heard
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Wouldn’t it be great to really understand the needs and desires of a whole generation….in detail??

Over the last sixty years generations have been defined by the generational  influences of their parents and political, economic and technical developments of their times. Research has further defined specific groups in the population to help marketing, politicians and the media focus their messages. Understanding what the population wanted and what they thought involved a process, but now, thanks to Generation Y we understand a lot more about their motivations, likes and pet hates. They have delivered in the moment reactions to television programmes, government policy, celebrity behaviour, and brand activity. But who are they?

Around 20% of the adult population in the UK was born between ’80s and early ’90s. These are Generation Y, born mainly of Generation X who are educated, active, and grew up in an era of social diversity and change in music (glam rock, new wave, punk..). Generation Y has emerged into a world of rapidly expanding technology and social change. They have grown up plugged in to games consoles, computers,  and mobile phones so no surprise that emails, text and social media is their preferred communication format.

WDG recently carried out a study of this sector of the population. Digital Natives, so called because of their reliance on their smart phones and laptops, access a wide social network, giving them vast connections and ‘friends’, but what is important to them is family connections. Many have grown up with overworked parents or single working parents, and this has informed a different approach to work/life balance. Where Generation X live to work, Y generation live then work.  Unsurprisingly, traditionally structured companies are less of an attraction for Y’ers; they don’t subscribe to corporate rules and culture, classic business models, and working hours. They seek meaningful work with constant change so that they can develop professionally.

They comprise a mosaic of traits which often seems incompatible. They are often perceived by older generations to be egotistical and brash, possibly because Digital Natives are confident and express their views honestly, but really they are eager to learn and contribute. They assert themselves frequently through their online networks and understand the importance of digital media. They want to make a lot of money, but they also believe in supporting non profit causes. They will pay a high price for brands but are aware of a good savings plan. Most significant is their unceasing optimism despite the fact that they grew up in an era of world terrorism and economic  recession. Far from being fearful and introverted Y’ers are positive with a ‘can-do’ approach to their lives.

Many Generation Y who completed further education have found it difficult to secure a job in this recession, yet the UK is one of the countries most geared up to educate children at the highest level. These tech savvy digital natives are a real catch to employers who are willing to embrace their traits. They use technology to work efficiently, they do not conform to traditional working hours, their behaviour is authentic and honest, and they work best when the job is meaningful to them.

This generation is a golden chalice for Marketing. Their honesty and confidence in sharing their views, likes and dislikes with a wide online audience means that companies get ‘in the moment’ feedback from their customers. Brand developers are now able to have a dialogue with their market, harvest ideas, and create brands that are assured success.

The top 5 desirable brand characteristics as defined by Generation Y are:

1. it has its own style

2 it makes me feel happy and rewarded

3 it is up to date, of the moment

4 it has a clean reputation, is ethical in manufacturing process and raw materials, it is not associated with negative press

5 it is clear and simple

For more information about Digital Natives please contact WDG Research directly.


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